The Dental Infections, Gum Disease Produces Astonishing Blood Changes

Dr. Prices supposed that dentists would know if any changes took places in a patient’s blood when a dental infection was present, but found no reports in scientific literature on that subject. This led him to do exhaustive blood studies of patients and animals to determine the side effects of root canal infections.
Thousands of blood tests on patients and animals Infected by root filled teeth showed?

  • Lymphocytes(white blood cells) increased in humans and increased 58 percent in rabbits.
  • Polymorphonuclear leukocytes, a form of white blood cells, decreased in humans and in animals to 33 percent less than normal.
  • Hemoglobin changed very little, either up or down.
  • Hemophilia, a tendency to hemorrhage, occured frequently in rabbits.
  • Increased amounts of sugar were found in the blood.
  • In some rabbits, higher amounts of ionic calcium were found; but in most rabbits, calcium was lower.
  • resulting in 15 to 20 different pathologic conditions.
  • There was increased uric acid and nitrogen retention.
  • Alkaline reserves decreased, resulting in acidosis.
  • Some patients and all animals lost weight. Patients suffering rheumatic disease often experienced a withering away of their tissues.
    Patients with pyorrhea pockets loaded with pus suffered severe weight loss, as did animals innoculated with diluted solutions of the crushed pyorrhetic teeth that had all the bacteria filtered out. This demonstrated dramatically that the toxins of the bacteria, rather than bacteria itself, caused the weight loss and death of the animals.
    Should you think this may have been an accidental or occasional occurance, this study involved 667 rabbit inoculations. In a group of 667 successive rabbit inoculations, some with cultures, some with filtrates of cultures, and many with filtered washings from crushed teeth, all were found to be bacteria free. Of these, 33 1/3 percent lost 10 to 30 percent; while 3.6 percent pained from 30 to 50 percent.
    Inasmuch as all of the rabbits were maintained on the same diet throughout these test, these changes in their blood and weight, whether up or down, must be considered diagnostic symptoms of the presence of dental infections, either from action of the bacteria or their toxins.
    All rabbits that had inoculations of infected material involved in dental infection, or had infected teeth implanted under their skin, lost weight. The more severe the infection, the greater the weight loss.
    Dr. Price noted patients suffering from rheumatic disease were prone to the withering away of their tissues. The emaciation could range from 10 to 25 percent in ordinary cases and 35 to 40 percent in extreme ones. He reported that one woman patient who had a normal weight of 130 dropped to 72 pounds. Upon removal of her dental infections, her weight quickly climbed from 72 pounds to 111. A culture taken from one of her infected teeth was inoculated into a rabbit. In four days time this rabbit had a weight loss from 1381 to 1105 grams(20 percent).

Protein Diet – What Does It Mean For Your Body?

To really understand the impact of a protein diet, it’s important to know how it affects and interacts with your body.
When we speak of your muscles, glands, and organs, they are mainly made up of protein. Indeed the two major components making up our bodies are water and protein. So, why all the fuss about protein diet?
There is definitely a link between enhancing muscle and protein since muscle is largely composed of protein. So the argument goes, protein diets help in muscle growth which in turn, helps to fight fat.
Just as there are good and bad fats and carbohydrates, there are different categories of proteins as well.
Proteins are composed of amino acids, and the human body requires 20 such amino acids for it’s normal growth and development. When considering a protein diet, it is important to know that certain foods carry proteins containing essential amino acids which are NOT produced by the body itself but ARE essential to the body’s processing of the other 12 non-essential amino acids.
What does all this mean? Your protein diet must include foods that not only provide non-essential amino acids, but more important, must include foods that supply your body with essential amino acids.
Foods you should consider for your protein diet include: broccoli, spinach, walnuts (or many other nuts), beans, lentils, pastas, and barley.

“Orphan Drugs”: Hope Where There Is Little or No Hope

NEW YORK, N.Y., February 18, 2004 ñ On a visit to his doctor, Gary Jacob received distressing news ñ not about himself, but a friend of the doctor’s.
While playing with one of his children, the doctorís friend fell and broke a rib. That was bad enough, but during the examination at the hospital, the father was hit with a startling and totally unexpected diagnosis ñ he had a disease known as multiple myeloma, a bone marrow blood cancer.
The diagnosis was nothing less than a death sentence.
Jacob knew of the anguish of multiple myeloma patients. The disease is incurable and nearly always fatal, one of the rare diseases that have few, if any, available treatments. They are known as “orphan” diseases, shunned by most drug-makers because the patient populations are small and commercial development of a drug is seen as economically unattractive.
Mr. Jacob was aware because, as Chief Executive Officer of Callisto Pharmaceuticals, Inc., a small Manhattan-based biopharmaceutical company, he is leading a scientific effort to develop a new orphan drug called “Atiprimod” for multiple myeloma patients.
“The father’s disease brought home to me that what we are doing is really important,” says Mr. Jacob. “Everyone agrees we need more drugs to treat multiple myeloma. There are people out there dying without real hope because of a lack of effective treatment for all patients.”
In steadily increasing numbers, orphan drugs are providing new doses of hope where little or none at all existed. In the decade before the inception of the federal Food and Drug Administration’s orphan drug program, 10 drugs were developed by pharmaceutical companies for orphan diseases. In the decades since, the FDA says nearly 250 new drugs were developed and approved, and hundreds more are in the pipeline.
Atiprimod is one of those wending its way toward the marketplace. Callisto recently obtained orphan drug designation from the FDA, providing the company with financial incentives to continue the costly development process.
The program covers drugs for orphan diseases with patient populations under 200,000.
The National Organization for Rare Disorders reports about 25 million people in the United States suffer from an estimated 6,000 orphan diseases.
Diseases such as cystic fibrosis, complications affecting HIV-infected people, Gaucher’s disease, hemophilia and rare forms of cancer were among the orphans without effective medicines until the FDA program went into effect in 1983 and paved the way for new drugs for patients with these diseases.
Large drug-makers have been largely missing from the efforts.
According to the orphan drug program’s deputy director, Dr. John McCormick, only 15% of applications for orphan drug designation have come from the larger pharmaceutical companies.
The reason: expectations of unfavorable investment returns.
The FDA orphan drug incentives ñ grants, seven years of marketing exclusivity and tax breaks ñ have drawn small pharmaceutical companies with promising drug candidates into the breach.
While the future is brighter, the task is still daunting to develop drugs for orphan diseases.
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease, affects 30,000 Americans with 8,000 new cases diagnosed annually; Huntington’s disease also affects about 30,000 patients.
Some diseases affect fewer than 100 patients, according to the National Institutes of Health.
An estimated 50,000 patients have multiple myeloma with 15,000 new patients diagnosed each year. Last year, the FDA approved a new drug Velcade for patients with the disease. However, there are still a number of multiple myeloma patients with no treatment available.
Dr. Kenneth C. Anderson, who played a major role in the preclinical development and clinical trials of Velcade and is now a member of Callisto’s Medical Advisory Board, is among the experts who see a need for more drugs to treat multiple myeloma.
“He is excited to see Atiprimod enter clinical trials for evaluation in multiple myeloma patients,” Jacob said of Anderson. “He believes it has an opportunity to help patients who have not responded to other drugs. “
Dr. Anderson is director of the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Center of the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, MA, and Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School.
The Phase I/IIa trials for Atiprimod are slated to begin later this month.
Dr. Donald Picker, Callisto’s Senior Vice President of Drug Development, said studies of Atiprimod in collaboration with scientists at the National Cancer Institute have been very promising.
“In essence, we’ve shown in these early studies that Atiprimod has the potential to intervene with cancer cells and tumors in three ways ñ by inhibiting their formation, by programming their death and by limiting their ability to grow blood vessels necessary for their survival. Taken together, these findings suggest that Atiprimod could potentially represent a novel class of compounds for development for therapeutic intervention in human cancers,” said Dr. Picker.